Category Archives: environmental justice

[NEWS] Activists: Sustain Veto of New Hampshire Biomass Burning Bill

– by Glynis Hart, August 24, 2018, Eagle Times

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Photo: Eagle Times

Two bills about renewable energy sources — biomass burning and small electrical generation originators — that were vetoed by Gov. Chris Sununu June 19, drew public comment at the Claremont City Council meeting Wednesday. Citizens asked the council to vote against the biomass burning plants, and in favor of enhanced net-metering for small alternative energy systems like wind and solar.

Rebecca Mackenzie, representing ACTS Now, a Claremont group, read a letter with multiple signers, asking the council to support Sununu’s veto of Senate Bill (SB) 365, and to override the governor’s veto of a different bill, SB 446. The letter is circulating around the state in response to a movement by legislators to override the governor’s vetoes of the two bills.

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[NEWS] Anti-Waste Incineration Bill Fails in New York

– by Cole Rosengren, June 21, 2018, Waste Dive

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Photo: Jerry Jackson / Baltimore Sun

The New York State Assembly failed to pass A11214, meaning efforts to advance this proposed law are effectively stalled until the legislature returns for regular session in 2019. The last action on this bill was unanimous approval from the Assembly Ways and Means committee on June 19.

Circular enerG heralded this result and pushed back in a detailed statement, calling the bill’s claims “science fiction” and “bogus.”

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[NEWS] Rhode Island Biomass Bill Sparks Debate Between Environmentalists, Energy Developers

– by Avory Brookins, May 21, 2018, Rhode Island Public Radio

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Photo: Rhode Island Public Radio

Environmentalists and green energy companies in Rhode Island are at odds over a bill that could advance the development of biomass power plants in the state.

Biomass is organic material, such as wood, that can be burned to produce energy. The Environmental Protection Agency also considers it a renewable resource.

However, biomass is not included in the state’s “net-metering” program, which applies to other renewable technologies, such as solar and wind.

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SURVEY: Wood Smoke Activist Experience And Perception Study

– by Dr. Michael Mehta, Thompson Rivers University

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Photo: Science Nordic

This study will explore how wood smoke activists from around the world have engaged in advocacy work to improve local air quality.

SURVEY LINK: https://www.surveymonkey.ca/r/wood_smoke_activists

This research will provide such individuals with a comprehensive review of their situation and how it differs from others.

The research also expands on social movements research by examining a new and emerging class of actors who have been relatively ignored in the social science literature.

You must be at least 18 years of age to participate in this study.

The study is being performed by Dr. Michael Mehta at Thompson Rivers University in Kamloops, British Columbia, Canada. Dr. Mehta is a Professor of Geography and Environmental Studies, and he is cross-listed with the Department of Sociology and Anthropology. He can be reached by email at mmehta@tru.ca or by telephone at (250) 852-7275 for any questions that you may have about this study.

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[NEWS] Trash-to-Biofuel Facility Set to Open in Maine

– by Alex Acquisto, January 5, 2018, Bangor Daily News

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The company behind a state-of-the-art solid waste disposal facility in Hampden designed to convert trash into biofuel has secured enough funding to begin operations in May.

Craig Stuart-Paul, CEO of Maryland-based Fiberight LLC, announced this week that his company has secured $70 million for a municipal solid waste center off Coldbrook Road — $45 million through a tax-exempt bond with the Finance Authority of Maine and the remainder in private equity funds.

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[NEWS] How a Trash Incinerator Became “Green” Energy

– by Scott Dance, December 15, 2017, Baltimore Sun

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Photo: Jerry Jackson / Baltimore Sun

A trash incinerator in Southwest Baltimore is the city’s largest single source of air pollution. But a state law has nonetheless allowed it to collect roughly $10 million in subsidies over the past six years through a program intended to promote green energy.

Few commuters who pass the imposing white smokestack on Interstate 95 have any idea that the plant burns their household waste, that their electric bills help to maintain it, or that it releases thousands of pounds of greenhouse gases and toxic substances — carbon dioxide, hydrochloric acid, formaldehyde among them — into the air every year.

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