Tag Archives: Red Rock Biofuels

[NEWS] Forest Biofuel Facility Gets Go-Ahead in Oregon

– by Kurt Liedteke, April 15, 2018, Herald and News

red rockAfter countless meetings, hearings, discussions and planning, all hurdles have been cleared for construction of a new renewable energy biofuels plant in Lake County.

Red Rock Biofuels, a Colorado-based company established in 2011, has had its sights set on Lakeview since 2013 as a target location to build its first operational facility; identifying the location for its proximity to rail, highways, the Ruby natural gas pipeline and an abundance of forest bi-products to be collected and converted to jet fuel.

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[NEWS] Planned Biomass Facilities Still Simmering for Oregon

– by Hilary Corrigan, November 8, 2016, Bend Bulletin

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Proposed biomass facility for La Pine, Oregon

While two firms continue to develop plans for new biomass facilities in Central Oregon that would produce power and fuel, a utility continues researching whether biomass could run its coal-fired power plant in the region.

Biogreen Sustainable Energy Co., based in Vancouver, Washington, still plans to build a 25 megawatt facility — first suggested in 2009 — on a nearly 20-acre site in La Pine’s industrial park.

“We’re just on hold,” said Rob Broberg, president of the firm.

Building the $75 million project depends on securing a contract to sell the power, likely to a utility in Oregon or California trying to meet requirements for renewable energy.

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[OPINION] Advanced Biofuels: The Vast Taxpayer Cost of Failed Cellulosic and Algal Biofuels

[Read the opposing view to this opinion piece, “Advanced Biofuels: Nothing’s Perfect, But There’s A Lot of Good,” by Joanne Ivancic, executive director of Advanced Biofuels USA.]

– by Almuth Ernsting, co-director, Biofuelwatch (excerpted version reprinted with permission from Independent Science News)

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Now-bankrupt KiOr biofuels site in Columbus, Mississippi (Photo: Independent Science News)

Biofuels consumed today are usually ethanol made from the sugar in sugar cane (or sugar beet) or they may be made from starch in grains. In the U.S. this is mostly corn starch. Alternatively, biodiesel may be made from plant oils such as soybean or canola oil.

Cellulosic biofuels, on the other hand, are biofuels made from crop residues (e.g. corn stover), wood, or whole plants, especially grasses (e.g. switchgrass). Cellulosic biofuels include cellulosic ethanol (made by isolating, breaking down and then fermenting the complex sugars in the cell walls of plants), as well as ‘drop in biofuels.’

In November 2014, cellulosic biofuel company KiOR filed for bankruptcy, having shut down their refinery in Columbus, Mississippi earlier that year. The reasons behind KiOR’s failure are simple: Most of the time, they couldn’t get their technology to work enough to produce biofuels and when they did manage it, yields were far lower than KiOR had claimed.

The plant, built to produce 13 million gallons of biofuels a year, produced a mere 133,000 gallons in 2013, sold another 97,000 gallons in early 2014, and then shut down. KiOR had claimed to achieve a yield of 67 gallons from each ton of dry biomass and to be working towards a target of 90 gallons/ton. Yet according to internal documents cited in Mississippi’s lawsuit, KiOR’s actual yields remained a mere 20-22 gallons/ton.

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